Articles Posted in Injunctions

An injunction (or protective order) can be a good way for there to be an immediate response when children need to be protected from any person, including a parent.  Many times, injunctions will come after the police and the Department of Children and Families are involved.  The injunction process is typically the quickest way for there to be court intervention, especially if the incident that necessitates the need of a protective doesn’t not lead to an arrest of anyone.  There could be many reasons to seek an injunction for protection on behalf of a minor child.  This article will focus on abuse allegations.

InjunctionWhenever a child is subjected to intentional infliction of physical or emotional harm, child abuse has occurred, as defined by Florida Statute 827.03.  This issue comes up sometimes after divorces or in paternity cases where children go between mom’s house and dad’s house.  Of course, physical discipline is allowed, but going too far becomes a crime, and can also be the basis for having an injunction put into place.  Florida Statute 741.30 allows for injunctions in domestic violence situations; child abuse qualifies as domestic violence.

If one parent files for an injunction to get protection for their children, if granted, the injunction can control time-sharing and visitation until a family court can hear the case and determine what is best for the children.  An injunction court may limit the visits to supervised visits, or the court may stop visitation all together.

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Social media has become an everyday part of life for many people, including Florida residents.  Oftentimes, conflicts between people begin on social media platforms.  Other times, issues begin in the “real world”, but are carried out in forums like Facebook and Twitter.  Recently, I encountered a situation that falls into the latter category.  Most Jacksonville injunction and family lawyers are all too familiar with the story of the old spouse  and the new spouse having issues with each other.  Petitions for injunctions or restraining orders end up being filed in many cases.  Physical violence is not always what prompts the petitions being filed.  When the feud manages to stay verbal, rather than become physical, the next best way to elevate the conflict for many is often to turn to social media.  Mean and nasty things are said, sometimes even threatening things, with a very large social media audience watching and weighing in themselves.

So what happens when one person harasses, stalks, threatens, or cyberstalks the other on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc…?  If both parties live in Florida, the answer is simple: an injunction petition or a petition for a restraining order may be filed.  Florida laws allows for the petition for protection against stalking to be filed in the Florida county where the defendant lives or in the county where the action accrues , meaning the place where the acts are committed.  Florida Statute 784.0485 creates a cause of action that specifically allows an individual, or an adult on behalf of a child, to file a petition for protection against stalking.  The petitioner, through the petition for a protective order, will ask the court to order the violator to have no contact with and stay away from the petitioner.  The court will weigh the evidence and make a decision whether to grant the request for an injunction.  However, when the conduct that is complained about takes place entirely on social media, like Facebook or Twitter, the court may have more of an issue when determining whether the injunction should or can be issued if the violator is a resident of another state.

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1. “I brought my ‘friend’ with me to the interview.”

You and I have an attorney client privilege. But once you bring in a third party, whether it’s a friend, a lover or whoever, the benefit of the attorney client privilege is gone. Unless that third party is named in the case or otherwise officially associated with the case, there is no attorney client privilege.. If a friend or a lover is in a meeting with attorney and the case goes sour, in the event of a trial or deposition, there is no privilege and all those secrets can spill out in a deposition or in court.

2. “I am so depressed over this.”

An order to show cause is a type of court order that requires one or more parties in a court proceeding to come to court to justify, explain, or prove something to the court. Typically it means the Judge in a case needs more information before he or she decides to do something. For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children.

Other examples of an order to show cause in a family law context would be when one parent has not been paying court ordered temporary child support while a case is pending. One party may petition the court to find the other party in contempt. The court may issue an order to show cause to find out if the allegation is true and ascertain why the party is not paying support. Perhaps the party is was in the hospital and was not able to work. The judge can then make an informed decision regarding the order and issue an appropriate sanction or no sanction at all.

If you are on the receiving end of a notice for an order to show cause, it is not something to set aside or ignore. You may wish to contact a family law attorney to assist you in protecting your rights. If you have such an order in hand, or have any questions regarding any other legal issue, give Law Office of David M. Goldman a call at 904-685-1200.

As an experienced Jacksonville Beach Divorce Lawyer, I often see couples at their worst. Many times, when a relationship is breaking up, the civility between the parties is also lost, and the harassing begins. This harassment can go from simply bothersome to criminal.

Florida law requires that if you feel that you are becoming the victim of harassment, you must first put the offender on notice to stop calling you or your family members or to cease the harassing act. You should keep a log of each call with the time, date, and number from where the call came and from whom. If the offender continues to harass you after being placed on notice to stop, then the act becomes criminal and you may seek the protection of the police or the Office of the State Attorney.

Also harassment may rise to the level of domestic violence if the harassment includes a threat or threats of violence. If physical threats have been made and there is a history of domestic violence an injunction (aka restraining order) may be an option.

dv.jpgDomestic violence is a serious issue, and you should speak with the proper authorities as well as an Orange Park Domestic Violence Attorney if you have been a victim. But you may need to go a step further and have the court grant a protective order or an injunction preventing the other person from contacting you. This allows the police to arrest the person if he or she violates certain provisions of the court order. If he or she is arrested they could be looking at misdemeanor criminal charges placed against them.

However, what exactly does Florida law define domestic violence as in order to get an injunction?

“Domestic violence” means any assault, aggravated assault, battery, aggravated battery, sexual assault, sexual battery, stalking, aggravated stalking, kidnapping, false imprisonment, or any criminal offense resulting in physical injury or death of one family or household member by another family or household member.

gun.jpgAs a Jacksonville Family Law Attorney I have worked on numerous domestic violence injunction cases. Through my work on these cases I have come to understand there are many ramifications stemming from injunctions for domestic violence that people are simply and completely unaware of.

Specifically, not even one of my past clients was aware of the effect domestic violence injunctions had on their gun rights. None of these clients had ever heard of the Lautenberg Amendment. Well, I’m going to take this opportunity to give a very brief rundown on this very topic.

The Lautenberg Amendment, which is often referred to as the Domestic Violence Amendment to the Gun Control Act, is codified at 18 U.S. Code §922(g)(9). In summary this act bans the ownership and use of firearms or ammunition by individuals convicted of a misdemeanor where the underlying charge is that of domestic violence, or who are under an injunction for domestic abuse. This act also makes in unlawful to knowingly sell or give a firearm or ammunition to such persons.

green beer.jpgAs a Jacksonville Family Law Lawyer, I am well versed in the issues of Domestic Violence and its effects on Jacksonville families. Domestic Violence seems to pop up in nearly 50% of my cases; whether the case be one of divorce, paternity, termination of parental rights or modification. The possibility of domestic violence being an issue is always on my mind.

I can’t help but wonder with St. Patrick’s Day coming up and the large amount of beer flowing, would Jacksonville domestic violence and or alcohol related crime rates experience an increase. With this question on my mind I decided to look into the relationship between alcohol and domestic violence.I stumbled upon the Stop Violence Against Women website and read a page titled, “Myths About Alcohol and Domestic Violence.”

The page read, “The relationship between alcohol or other substance abuse and domestic violence is complicated. A prevailing myth about domestic violence is that alcohol and drugs are the major causes of domestic abuse. In reality, some abusers rely on substance use (and abuse) as an excuse for becoming violent. Alcohol allows the abuser to justify his abusive behavior as a result of the alcohol. While an abuser’s use of alcohol may have an effect on the severity of the abuse or the ease with which the abuser can justify his actions, an abuser does not become violent “because” drinking causes him to lose control of his temper.”

woman gun.jpgJacksonville has long been regarded as the most violent city in Florida, even beating out Miami. In 2010, Duval County had a total of 7,798 domestic violence offenses. Thus, it is not surprising that New4Jax.com is reporting that more women are choosing to arm them selves for self defense purposes.

News4Jax’s January 4th article titled, “More Women Packing Heat,” states that, “there are between 15 and 20 million ladies packing heat these days and target shooting is one of the fastest-growing female sports.” Also, gun expert Bill Martin has had such a large demand from women he has had to create all-female concealed weapon permit classes.

It looks as though more and more women are taking precautions to defend themselves from a potential attack.

WILKES, DEVIN JUAN.jpgYou think you have heard it all and then you read an article titled, “Jacksonville Police: Mom Used Baby As Shield When Boyfriend Attacked Her.” How could this be? Well, allegedly, on December 9, 2011, Devin Juan Wilkes and his girlfriend and mother of his child, Sheena Hunter, got into an argument over their relationship. The argument quickly became violent.

Reportedly, to protect herself from being beaten and stabbed Hunter grabbed their son and held him between herself and Wilkes. Wilkes then grabbed their son and threw him face first on the ground. The violence ensued with Wilkes choking Hunter and then fleeing with her car.

On January 2, 2012, authorities went to the residence, Hunter answered the door and informed the authorities she had not seen Wilkes since the alleged incident. However, after allowing the authorities in to search her residence, Wilkes was quickly located hiding in a closet. Wilkes was arrested and has been charged with numerous crimes including; aggravated assault, domestic battery and child abuse.

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