Articles Posted in Divorce

It is not uncommon in a divorce case for one of the spouse’s not to want to end the marriage.  One partner may think that there is a chance of working things out and resolving their differences, or they may not want to legally dissolve the marriage for other reasons.  If your spouse has started divorce proceedings, and you really don’t want a divorce, your options may be limited but there is something you can do.  Florida is one of seventeen states that follow No-Fault laws in divorce cases.  The Petitioner only has to allege that the marriage is irretrievably broken. If you really do not want a divorce you should answer the Petition for Dissolution by alleging you do not believe the marriage is irretrievably broken.  Florida Statute §61.052(2)(b)1 allows you to request the Court to Order you and your spouse to marriage counseling.  It is rarely done and there are specific requirements that must be met.  Your Jacksonville Family Lawyer can assist you in understanding this law and representing you in Court.

In order for a spouse to utilize this statute, the parties must have a child together.  If the Court grants the request for marriage counseling, psychiatrist, priest, minister, rabbi, or any other professional the divorce will be placed on hold for approximately three months to allow the counseling to take place.  Florida Statute §61.052(2)(b)2 allows the Court to continue the proceedings for a reasonable length of time not to exceed 3 months, to enable the parties themselves to effect a reconciliation.  During any period of continuance, the Court has jurisdiction to make appropriate orders for the support and alimony of the parties; a parenting plan, support, maintenance, and education of any minor children of the marriage; attorney’s fees; and the preservation of the property of the parties.  Consult your Jacksonville Family Lawyer for assistance with your case.

As previously stated, the above statute is rarely used.  This is because if one person wants to end the marriage, counseling is usually not effective.  By the time a person has made the decision to start the divorce process, they have usually given it a lot of thought and intend to go through with it.

What is Domestic Violence?

Under the Florida Statutes, Domestic Violence is defines as “any assault, aggravated assault, battery, aggravated battery, sexual assault, sexual battery, stalking, aggravated stalking, kidnapping, false imprisonment, or any criminal offenses resulting in physical injury or death of one family or household member by another family or household member.” F.S. 741.28.

Is Domestic Violence Criminal?

This is a question that is often asked by custodial parents.  If you live in Florida the answer is yes.  Florida has a relocation statute, and it is found at §61.13001 in the Florida Statutes.  If you have a minor child and you are divorced or no longer in a relationship with the other parent, you cannot move more than 50 miles from the current residence without obtaining permission from the other parent or consent from the Court.  This condition applies to both the custodial parent and the non-custodial parent.  Your Jacksonville family attorney can assist you in determining how you can comply with the relocation statute to enable you to move.

The statute requires that unless there is an agreement between the parties, a parent or other person with time-sharing rights seeking relocation must file a petition to relocate and serve it upon the other parent, and every other person entitled to access to or time-sharing with the child.  The pleadings must meet the following requirements:

a)  The petition to relocate must be signed under oath or affirmation under penalty of perjury and include:

What is Support without Dissolution?

Section 61.09 allows a married individual to file for support (child support and alimony) where a person does not seek a dissolution.  This statute allows a party to seek alimony or child support.  However, that party may or may not request the entry of a parenting plan.  A final judgment of support does not include distribution of marital assets.  This type of action is sometimes referred to as separate maintenance.

“If a person having the ability to contribute to the maintenance of his or her spouse and support of his or her minor child fails to do so, the spouse who is not receiving support may apply to the court for alimony and for support for the child without seeking dissolution of marriage, and the court shall enter an order as it deems just and proper.”  F.S. 61.09.

This Jacksonville family law attorney’s office represents parents seeking shared parental responsibility and sole parental responsibility.  In all child custody matters, the parties or the Court must determine what type of parental responsibility the parties will have.  The two types of parental responsibility are Shared Parental Responsibility and Sole Parental Responsibility.  It’s important that all parents understand the difference between the two types.  Shared Parental Responsibility means that the parties will confer with each other regarding all matters concerning the minor child that they share.  This includes such things as educational decisions, residence decisions, religious decisions, and medical decisions.  If sole parental responsibility is granted to one parent, that parent does not have to confer with the other parent about anything.  Check with your Jacksonville family law attorney about this issue before making a decision.

Most family law Courts believe that the parents should share these types of decisions and they order shared parental responsibility unless there is some good reason not to have the parents share in the decision making.  Florida statute 61.13(2)(e)(2) allows the Court to grant sole parental responsibility if the “court determines that shared parental responsibility would be detrimental to the child, it may order sole parental responsibility and make such arrangements for time-sharing as specified in the parenting plan as will best protect the child or abused spouse from further harm”.  An example of a good reason not to order shared parental responsibility in a case would be if one of the parents has exhibited poor decision making regarding the child in the past.  Some examples of poor decision-making would-be things like 1) failing to register your child for school or home schooling, 2) failure to provide appropriate caregivers for when you are not present and able to care for the child yourself, or 3) failure to get medical treatment for a child when it needs medical care.  Some more serious reasons for ordering sole parental responsibility are if there is a history of domestic violence, or a parent is incarcerated.  In those instances, there is a rebuttable presumption of unfitness that will arise that shifts the burden of proof to the defending party to show they are not unfit.  There may be other practical reasons to give one parent decision making powers over the other parent in certain areas.   An example would be if one of the parents is not educated and is unable to assist the child with their education, the Court might give one parent ultimate decision making in the educational area.  Contact your Jacksonville family law attorney to advocate on your behalf what is in the best interest of your child.

When reaching an agreement regarding parental responsibility, the parent should be careful not to relinquish their rights regarding this issue as it is very difficult to change the parental responsibility division once it is agreed upon or ordered by the Court.  To change anything regarding the minor children once it is established by the Court, you must show that there has been a substantial change in circumstances that makes it detrimental to the welfare of the child not to change the parental responsibility.  This is a very high burden of proof that lies somewhere between the preponderance of the evidence (or more than 50%) and beyond a reasonable doubt (or 99%).  As always, before attempting to maneuver through the legal system alone, it is advisable to consult with a family law attorney first.  Your Jacksonville family law attorney is here to advise you, guide you and advocate for you.

If Your License is suspended for Child Support Obligations, What Can You Do?

Florida law allows one’s driver’s license to be suspended when they fail to meet their support obligation.  If your license is suspended as a result of child support obligations that are not satisfied, you should understand the law.  If one truly cannot pay their obligation because they simply do not have the financial resources to do so, your license cannot be suspended, but you must act promptly.

Your License Can Be Suspended for Child Support Failures

Why Timesharing is Important?

A dissolution can be a very emotional experience for some.  This is especially true when a divorce involves children.  The current rules require that when parties have children, a parenting plan must be developed.  The parenting plan details parental responsibility, timesharing (formally referred to as visitation), and child support.  It may also include additional details unique to a particular child or children, or it may address a unique family situation.  Although the Court system attempts to equalize timesharing between parents, this is not always possible.  Parents may work or live so far apart that a 50% timesharing schedule would be impractical.

What Are the Different Types of Timesharing?

How do you and your spouse share the finances?

Most married couples have their finances mixed together. For instance, it is not unusual for a married couple to share credit cards, savings and checking accounts, real estate, and other property.  When parties go through a dissolution, these finances must be untangled.  The process of distributing assets to each party is known as equitable distribution.  The process of exchanging financial information with the opposing party is known as mandatory disclosure.  The Family Law Rule of Procedure, Rule 12.285 details what information must be disclosed as well as the time periods for disclosure.

What forms do you need to complete?

What is a Prenuptial Agreement?

A prenuptial agreement is a contract between two persons that are contemplating marriage that predetermines how property and other issues are to be dealt with upon divorce.  Prenuptial agreements require full disclosure by both parties.  This means that each party should be ready and willing to provide their present financial picture to the other.  Without such disclosure, the agreement may be susceptible to legal challenge.

What are the advantages of such an agreement?

Can I modify time-sharing for my children in Florida?

In Florida, it is the public policy of the state that each minor child has frequent and continuing contact with both parents after the parents separate or the marriage of the parties is dissolved and to encourage parents to share the rights and responsibilities, and joys of childrearing. We live in a pretty mobile society and oftentimes when divorce or separation occurs one of the parents is in another state or even another country. When that occurs, it is important that Jacksonville parents keep the child’s best interest at the forefront of their minds, taking that into consideration in fostering the parent-child relationship with the non-custodial parent. The parents and your Jacksonville divorce attorney need to get creative in crafting a Parenting Plan that will both work for the parents and foster the relationship between the child and the non-custodial parent.

How to Communicate better with long-distance time-sharing in Florida.

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